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. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the last several years and we're seeing the kids learn better now. flint and pontiac have emergency managers, working
deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
the seventh fittest economy in the world. we're ranked 34th in primary education and health care. our macro economic environment is 111th. that cannot be right. our next guest says the notion that we're losing our competitive edge is widespread and pervasive, it is not necessarily correct. ed mcbride is the washington bureau chief for the author of the special ro on america competitiveness. welcome, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> would you like to tell me, and i welcome the message that things are not as bleak as we've been told. please. talk us off the ledge. >> well, as you said, there is a the love hand wringing, a lot of reports. these dire statistic that's seem so dreadful. it is almost impossible to remember they're true. 111th? that's to do with the size of the national debt basically. but what all these gloomy sort of hand wringing accounts neglect, they focus on washington and on gridlock and on the failure to resolve all the questions about the budget and they don't look at what's going on in the rest of the country. the good news is, that in the rest country, people aren't s
and to get an education and get a good job, to worship got in their own way, to get married, to raise a family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begins. not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process, but in the daily connections, that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land and in this sacred city of jerusalem. and let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust or those young people who have learned to overcome a legacy of mistrust that they inherited from their parents. because
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
to the story illustrate a problem with the way people are educated about rain and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impuni impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn, it is the fact that people need to learn from consent is, what stanley impairment is, intervene in a cultural of masculinity. >> speaking about the toxic culture o
the reaction to the story illustrate a problem with the way people are educated about rain and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn, it is the fact that people need to learn from consent is, what stanley impairment is, intervene in a cultural of masculinity. >> speaking about the toxi
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
, education, health care, and the more that they can be seen as a part that's inclusive, better shot they have at this growing population. you mention this idea of naturalization ceremony. richard, i became naturalized when i was nine years old. i still remember that moment in san francisco city hall, raising my right hand with my mother. it was so emotional, impactful and exciting, i can only imagine how folks feel being in front of the president helping administer the oath. >> it is such an experience to be there. >> it is beautiful. >> we are going there shortly when the president speaks which we expect to happen in about two minutes. one comment that has been made about the debate that's been on the hill about immigration reform when you look at high skill versus low skill, the high tech visa piece, this could hurt women more than men. talk about that when you look at the low skill issue in terms of bringing in new immigrants to the united states. >> not just for high skilled labor but low skilled labor, the majority of individuals that cross the border undocumented or overstay the visa ha
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
very passionatably as someone that grew up in new york city and bronx. my mom was an educator, worked in parts and administration for the district of education. the vanishing middle class in new york city, it is really a staggering thing to hold. having watched the trajectory of this city, the rising inequality, the losses of middle class jobs and low paying service jobs and then the -- massive increase in the cost of housing. i want to talk about how to stop new york from becoming essentially 1%, 99% city right after this. way the bristles moe to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. >> announcer: did you know there are secret black market websites around the world that sell stolen identities? >> 30-year-old american man, excellent credit rating. >> announcer: lifelock monitors thousands of these sites 24 hours a day. and if we discover any of our members' data for sale, lifeloc
come together and build new opportunities for housing to go in there. we could have adult education programs in there. we could have transitional opportunities for clinics. we could do a lot of things. let's not have a bunch of 52 plus buildings abandoned in our community. we do not need another eyesore. >> we're looking at the zool board voting on this on may 22nd. any chance of them turning back this decision? >> historically when they put out this list, and they put it out every year. we call it the hit list. they have carry through all the closings on the list. in the first six years there was something like 60 schools on the list. last year they were 22. they hit all 22. that being said, they've never done anything on this scale anywhere in the country. and so we're counting on a huge public outcry among people who are invested in the communities. parents, children, educators, all of us to make a stand and say don't do this in our city. don't dismantle our schools in such a scale. and we're prepared to make protests and speak out and hopefully the policymakers will change their
are educated about rape and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn from this one verdict, it is the fact that people need to understand what consent is and intervene in a toxic culture of mass cue lynnity. >> speaking about the toxic culture of masculinity, you of course spent a great deal
was a very educational show. we found out phish is starting a new album tomorrow. that's breaking news. and i got to look at my friend james bennett without a beard and i've got to say -- >> no, don't. >> he looks younger. he looks younger. don't you think? >> it's usually what he says. >> he looks younger. >> so i was asking you what made adam so great, editor of "new york" magazine. >> my boss, my friend and i think arguably the greatest magazine maker of this moment, of the last decade or so. >> he knows how to give a magazine a voice. very important. >> and visually. >> we had a lot of "new york" magazine people on today. >> and what a great cover story. >> knocking it out of the park. >> if it's way too early, what time is it, mike? >> well, it's time for "morning joe." but right now it's time for our ole pal crystal izz acht. >> i need a fix. ♪ i'm going down." >>> president obama's middle east tour treks on just hours after militants fire rockets out of gaza. >>> big moves back in washington as paul ryan's budget gets said for a vote in the house and vice president joe biden says the
. we're trying to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another. they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity, which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >>
away because se quest traditiqu. >> the educational grant for service member's children, killed in the wars, the tuition assistance to service members now in terms of their own education, those things getting cut are directly because of the sequester. do you think they should be fixed even if the rest of the sequester couldn't be fixed? even if we can't fix everything else? >> the letter to the secretary to ask him to please fix this issue with the tuition regardless on where sequestration is. >> it is ten years today from the date that we innovated iraq and you and i have talked a number of times, politics in the iraq war and there's a real distance between those of white house didn't fight and those who did and sacrificed so much. ten years out, what do you think the lessons are we still need to learn as a country. >> i think the lesson with we need to learn is real questions of information that's being given to you. i feel very strongly that in the run up to iraq, not only were the american people lied to, that the members of congress were lied to. i think a lot of members of
the young people here want. they want the ability to make their own decisions and get an education and get a good job and worship god in their own way, to get married, raise family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begin, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. >> this was mr. obama's chance to appeal to a new generation of israelis and to reach out to them in a personal way, something his critics charge he hasn't done before. in many ways it was vintage obama. the world witnessed the return of the hope and change go from 00:2from -- change guy from 2008. >> let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish compare things. >> get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will the middle east take president obama's message of compro
. joining me now is karen lewis. with a welcome, i know your biggest concern, aside from a good education for these kids are your teachers of which a thousand could lose their jobs. let's talk about the timing of this. you have chicago mayor rahm emanuel. he did issue the statement over the past decade. this decision was delayed while we put more money into keeping buildings open rather than investing it where it should be, in our children's education. now we'll be able to better use funds for our children's future. >> i think it's a lovely talking point. and this is what this mayor does. he uses rhetoric that sounds reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would
educated married mothers find themselves not uninterested in the conversation about having it all, but untouched by it. they are too busy minding their grandmother's old fashioned lives for values. like heirlooms and wear proudly as their own. joining the table is former news anchor campbell brown and editor and chief of "cosmopolitan" magazine and joanne coles is with us and also is katty kay. when you looked as thee numbers and sort of trend that you track here, what is behind it? is it a choice or reality? >> i think this is an economy story. these are not very affluent women who are educated in the ivy league who are fleeing their law firm jobs. these are women whose families are earn much less and in a world where our financial futures are uncertain and we don't know what is going to become of us and you're not making that much money and you've got two little kids and your husband is working all the time, it makes sense to lean out and focus on the home sphere. >> is that what you're finding the women that you interviewed, the one that you interviewed and the women you talked
of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move the party on those issues when you're still dealing with fundamentals in terms of personality. >> a lot of people in the republican party got the message, got those messages at least from the election. and are read
positive. that israel is an economic hub. the palestinians are among the most educated populations in the worldful there is great potential here if these two opposing sides would actually work together. that's why he has been stressing economic development as a possibility. >> now a $40 billion a year mutual trade relationship that dennis ross helped nurture along. thank you, dennis, and i should say nbc middle east adviser in chicago, jeffrey goldberg here. we'll be right back. no. there was that fuzzy stuff on the gouda. [ both ] ugh! when it came to our plants... we were so confused. how much is too much water? too little? until we got miracle-gro moisture control. it does what basic soils don't by absorbing more water, so it's there when plants need it. yeah, they're bigger and more beautiful. guaranteed. in pots. in the ground. in a ukulele. are you kidding me? that was my idea. with the right soil... everyone grows with miracle-gro. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of
what the young people here want. they want the ability to make their own decisions and get an education and get a good job and worship god in their own way, to get married, raise family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begin, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. >> this was mr. obama's chance to appeal to a new generation of israelis and to reach out to them in a personal way, something his critics charge he hasn't done before. in many ways it was vintage obama. the world witnessed the return of the hope and change go from 20from -- change guy from 2008. >> let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish compare things. >> get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will the middle east take president obama's message of c
highly educated they fell in love in a small bar in new york. they danced. th their dance continued through the decade each as thea contracted m.s. and edith took care of her. the couple left for canada where same-sex marriage was legal. for two years they were married. but when thea died this nation's laws did not recognize edith as thea's wife or beneficiary and so she was forced to pay hundreds of thousands in taxes that no straight couple will ever have to face. joining us now is victoria difrancesco sorto and msnbc latino and williams, an msnbc contributor. yeah, that's right. jimmy, i don't want to reduce a description of that beautiful relationship to the issue of taxes, but what is your view about how this will play out? will the supreme court find this particular section of the defense of marriage act unconstitutional? >> i think that they will, and you have to go back and look at two separate cases and justice kennedy and one was in lawrence and one was in texas. he sets up the language literally writes it into the case law and says, for all intents and purposes the due pr
please, please educate yourself, educate your family, go out and get tested. and that's what the name of the game is. go out and get tested. >> joy, the stats on minority communities and how just wildly disproportie porgportionately t affected by this. getting tested is is a huge part of the puzzle. but also so is getting treatment. we've been talking about obama care and what it does, it extends preventive services, free ones to 71 million americans and yet this weekend, there's a concerted effort to unwind obama care. not through broad strokes, but the republican strategy at this point seems to be death by 1,000 cuts, unwinding funding, doing things to make it more difficult to extend the insurance exchange. when in reality. this is still an epidemic in the black community, still an epidemic, globally as well. no one is speaking out for the good things that obama care is doing and the very important services it's extending to minority communities and nonminority communities. >> to say nothing of governors who are rejecting the medicaid expansion. which is the only way people got hea
follows in the footsteps of his father. >> the department of education, gone. interior, energy, hud, commerce, gone. that's how ron paul rolls. >> rand closes four cabinet agencies, education, energy, commerce, and housing and urban development. and it privatizes the tsa. but where paul ryan has thus far been reluctant, rand paul goes there. rand paul raises the social security retirement age, privatizes medicare, and turns medicaid, food stamps, and other social safety net programs into block grants. but not everything is mana for the right flank. rand paul also spends $500 billion less on the military than paul ryan, in order to, as he put it, keep the large military complex of yesterday in check. fox news sunday host chris wallace asked the scion of the paul dynasty about his bipolar approach. >> do you think there's room for a realistic, feasible presidential candidate who's to the left of obama on some issues and to the right of paul ryan on other issues? >> i think we have a confusing spectrum. this left/right spectrum doesn't always work for people. >> so, who voted for rand
third week. michigan's head start program could be next on the shopping block. nbc's chief education correspondent rehema ellis is joining me this afternoon from detroit and rehema, with a long distance hello to you, my friend, for many students in detroit there are problems with this education system which are now magnified by the statewide economic troubles. you kn i know you were talking about this issue with the governor. >> we were, and we're going to talk about it all with students when we have a town hall meeting here just a little while from now that everybody can watch online on education nation.com. but the governor says that they have no choice but to make some changes here because of the dire situation that they're in as far as their budget is concerned. the changes have been controversial. but when you think about it, just this one quick statistic, 27% of african-american students who are in the 11th grade and only 62% of white students in the 11th grade are reading at or above proficiency. and the governor says they have got to do better than that. just listen. >> if yo
so that the political change can actually stick. earlier, you were talking about brown v education. the fact that it didn't stick, we're avoiding that in the movement. we're telling the stories that stay in people's hearts so that when the laws are passed, they'll stick. >> it's interesting. i think we sometimes down play the cultural piece, but representative lee, you and i were talking in the makeup room that you were the first black cheerleader on your high school team. i'm clapping because i was a high school cheerleader. on one hand, you think what difference does it make if the cheerleading team is integrated? in fact, it does make a difference for us to be participating with one another in these so-called normative spaces in order to like generate that sense of familiarity. >> sure. it makes a big difference. because people have to identify. this is a diverse country, first of all. people have to identify on all fronts and when i went to high school, there were african-american, latino and asian pacific american students. but the criteria, you had to be blond and blue-eyed t
with continuing education and we're going to make sure we have research technology and innovation that's going to make our next generation prepare for their intellectual move forward into the 21st century jobs. >>> now to kentucky. new reporting suggests a number of big-time democrats not particularly thrilled with the idea of ashley judd challenging mitch mccouple in that state. some party leaders, including former president bill clinton, are trying to court another candidate, another female, allison lundergan grimes. ms. judd will make her announcement later this spring, a claim she has denied. her sister said of course i'd vote for her. i don't agree with anything she says half the time. we're so different. but i love my sister. >>> president obama's initiative to reduce violence in this country has been severely weakened. democratic majority leader harry reid said a ban on assault weapons. >> right now her amendment using the most optimistic numbers has less than 40 votes. that's not 60. i have no get something on the floor so we can have votes on that issue and the other issues that i tal
party. a kinder approach to immigration, more funding for medicare and education. george w. bush used to talk about his armies of compassion. but armies of compassion are not what george w. bush is remembered for. now more than a decade later the republican party seems to have revived the strategy that got him elected in the first place, this idea of compassionate conservatism, a kinder, less mean-seeming republican party. the question is why would it work now when it did not end up working for george w. bush except to get him elected once, and how can you earn an image change like that without changing any of your policies that earned you the image you now want to change. joining us is john brabender. mr. brabender, it's great to have you here. >> i'm glad to be here, and every i am i'm here, i'm increasingly convinced you are not going to switch and become a republican. >> i will keep trying to persuade you of that. let me ask you if you think my analysis is biased by the fact that i am not a republican. i look at sort of the republican prognosis for what went wrong, that autopsy th
to take the federal government out of the education and toss out a few grants to states to handle everything from medicaid to infrastructure. brown is also a member of the republican study committee, a group of house conservatives proposing a more aggressive alternative to the ryan plan and promising to balance the budget in just four years. the op-ed comes just a day after the rnc's autopsy report. yet that, too, is getting attacked from the right for not sticking to so-called conservative ideals. >> the republicans are just totally bamboozled right now and they are entirely lacking in confidence. they think they got landslided and they didn't. the republican party lost because it's not conservative. it didn't get its base up. >> i'd say it's always great to see rush limbaugh making illusions to spike lee's malcolm x. let's bring in ryan grim -- and democratic strategist chris k i kofinas. the budget proposal, how bad is it when ryan's proposal is considered not radical enough? are we in pretty bad shape? >> i don't know where they think they're going with this. coming out and s
the federal government out of the education and toss out a few grants to states to handle everything from medicaid to infrastructure. brown is also a member of the republican study committee, a group of house conservatives proposing a more aggressive alternative to the ryan plan and promising to balance the budget in just four years. the op-ed comes just a day after the rnc's autopsy report. yet that, too, is getting attacked from the right for not sticking to so-called conservative ideals. >> the republicans are just totally bamboozled right now and they are entirely lacking in confidence. they think they got landslided and they didn't. the republican party lost because it's not conservative. it didn't get its base up. >> i'd say it's always great to see rush limbaugh making illusions to spike lee's malcolm x. let's bring in ryan grim -- and democratic strategist chris kofinas. the budget proposal, how bad is it when ryan's proposal is considered not radical enough? are we in pretty bad shape? >> i don't know where they think they're going with this. coming out and sayinging you want to
that the investments we make in education and the infrastructure are devastated in the ryan budget, and he makes false promising that could be kept about reducing the tax rates. the only people that are protected in the ryan budget are the wealthiest and the largest corporations. they tell the rest of america, you are responsible for managing this debt that we have gotten into. our budget takes a very different approach. it is balanced in terms of making sure we move to responsibly managing our debt and deficit, getting our deficit down to less than 3% of the gdp, as every economist in the bowls simps simpson, all the gang of six have focused us on doing, but also make sure we make that investments to keep our middle class strong. >> the point of our budget is to make sure that we show that we have a ten-year plan, if we can put it into place, we will get our economy moving again, we will begin to manage our debt, and we will quit doing this management by crisis where every time we turn around, the republicans say they'll shut the government down if we don't cut more. we need to have a responsible pla
the republicans in congress are doing. >> clean water, public safety, public education, public transportation, public housing, public health, medicare, medicaid, social security, it just keeps on unraveling and unraveling and that's their point. >> she keeps talking about what they are against but are they for anything and can they all agree with it? >> they are obviously for big, big tax cuts, reverend al, and they are for cutting programs in the middle class. they've shown that time and time again. it's clear that the autopsy, which is what you do on a dead body, so that's interesting, is a farce. it's a complete farce. they are saying, okay, we want the votes of young people, african-americans, women, even gays, but we're not going to change our policies to attract you. we're not going to be anything different that will tell you why you should vote for us. so it's a rebranding without any meaning and it's just gotten the party -- i mean, it's gotten the fighting with one of another, are you leaving us out, and reince priebus having to backtrack immediately saying, no, marriage is one man,
, especially with education, but there's always the bush name. that's good and bad, but they've been a bush in the white house forever, there's a lot of people that don't remember a republican president but george bush. >> that may not be a positive. thank you, chip. you can't bring your brother to the convention with you, you have problems. thank you, mr. mayor for coming on again. >>> up next, the president is in the middle east. he seems to be winning over many skeptical israelis especially the young who are not skeptical. that could be good things for the president. don't you think? this is a big, positive trip for him. this is "hardball," the place for politics. g, waiting... feel like you're growing older... waiting to look younger? don't wait. [ female announcer ] get younger looking skin fast. with new olay regenerist micro-sculpting cream. the next generation with 2 new anti-aging ingredients. it penetrates rapidly. visible wrinkle results start day 1. and you'll see younger looking skin before you even finish one jar. ♪ new olay regenerist. the wait is over. >>> well, could 2013
the department of education. he wants to stop aid to -- >> it's all over the place. that to me is the conservatives, not the common denominator of the party. what is the common denominator of the party i think is growth, opportunity, incomes, making us finally address this very serious debt, deficit. >> you're going to iowa. would you like to be a nominee of the republican party? >>> i've been to michigan, illinois, other places. i'm satisfied being governor of wisconsin. i had to do it twice to run for office. but both senators, they're somewhere in between. there's the prince. s that are timeless combined with the fact that we need to be more relevant as conservatives and republicans. what i mean by that, to your point, who in america grows up wanting to be dependent on government? who moves in from another country, comes in as an imgrant and doesn't want to live the american dream? we need to be the movement and the party that says we're the ones that have you not become dependent on government but empower you to live your treatment dream for more freedom and prosperity. >>
and ownership. when we're talking about the ability to educate your kid as you define, as you decide as a parent. those types of things really speaks to that much more than anything else in my view. >> michael steele, thank you very much. >> good to be with you. >> thanks for joining us and speaking back. >> and next, the president's trip to israel -- can he mend a strained relationship? >>> and still ahead, proof of citizenship. the supreme court takes up arizona's voter i.d. law today. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. which shirt feels more expensive? i g
the constitution, myself. i'm reasonably well educated. and i thank you for the lecture. >> well, there you have it. this is the face of the new republican right. they basically are for everyone having a gun whenever they want it. in fact, they encourage you have to a gun. >> they have no shame, to go back to the mccarthy period. and i think senator cruz is one of those individuals. i mean, i think he'll demagogue this issue and it plays well for his constituency. and he -- you know, i think he might even believe some of this. >> let's take a look at the numbers here. you're familiar with this this. this is different between passion and effective politics. the people with passion on this issue tend to be the gun people. look at these numbers, though. if you look at the whole country, now. armed guards in schools, pretty close. what do you think of that 50%, 48%? >> it's an easy solution people think about. there are a lot of schools that have police officers. >> you don't have a big -- i don't either. what about this assault weapons ban? it's just about 57%, 3 out of 5. not a strong endorsement. >>
to seniors. we will not balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education or on the backs of our commitments to seniors. whether it is under medicare or medicaid. what we do is immediately begin to reduce the deficit so they're growing much slower than the economy. which is the important measure. and then we gradually get the balance in the year round 2040. which by the way is the same year that the republican balance last year, the budget last year came into balance before they changed their priority. their priority now is balance at all costs. and our approach is focus on jobs in the economy and get the deficit down in a smart way. >> let's talk about the sequester for just a moment. what's the likelihood at this point that the sequester stays in place for the rest of the year? the fiscal year? >> well, it would be a big mistake for it to stay in place. that's why we propose in our budget to replace it so you can get the same deficit reduction benefit but over a longer period of time. >> but political feasibility. what's the likelihood it stays in place? >> well, political feas
to the hispanic chamber of commerce in los angeles and talks about increasing federal aid for education to hispanics and african-americans. who in the party right now, who in the republican party gives that speech? >> i think the problem is deeper than that. even when they talk about aid to the less fortunate, they make it sound like they're dropping nickels in a tin cup. what mitt romney misses and what the republicans miss is that even rich people need government. even if it is just to build the runways for their golf stream jets. it is not a case of charity. we're all in this together. this is the essential message that barack obama ran on with robert and ran on again in his re-election campaign. the republicans don't get that basic concept. even when they're talking about government programs, they're talking about them as charity. they're not charity. >> steve schmidt we're out of time on this segment, need a quick word before you go. your reaction to cpac? >> i said a couple weeks ago, it has become the star wars bar scene of the conservative movement. it was certainly that and mor
to change medicare into a voucher program, a dramatic cut in education, programs for children, medicaid, the health care program for poor people, and so it's hard to understand how they retreat from being really scary, and of course there's not going to be one penny of cuts to the wealthiest of americans tomorrow, and so being the stuffy old men, i kind of translate that into a rich and stuffy old, old men, and their solutions are absolutely ridiculous. i understand for young people they decided that they need to do more celebrity concerts and events. i'm wondering who they're going to get. maybe clint eastwood is really cool with the young people. >> i have a few ideas about that myself. dana before i give my ideas on their celebrity surrogates, you know, how do you mess with medicaid and medicare and think you're countering the image of being scary? and then, i mean, former bush campaign strategist matthew dowd, he compared the cpac gathering to a flintstones episode, listen to this. >>> yabba dabba do, they seem rather depressed, and actually the contingent woman had it right. they d
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